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Creating the Web We Want – EFA

In News, WikiLeaks, Anonymous, Sri Lanka, leaksource, Police State, Big Brother, NDAA, ACTA, FOI, SPIN, Australia, FED, Fiscal Cliff, Censorship, FBI, CIA, CISPA, Occupy, LEAKSOURCE ORIGINAL NEWS, DAILY NEWS ARCHIVE, Snowden, DEA, Surveillance, Assange, Archive, GCHQ, Big Data, EFF, Technology, Internet, Hacking, Microsoft, SORM, Five Eyes, Encryption, ASIO, Activism, Stratfor, TAO, PSYOP, MI6, MI5, TrapWire, ANT, File-Sharing, Delta Force, SOCOM, FDA, CYBERCOM on June 17, 2014 at 4:51 AM

The Electronic Frontiers Australia held a seminar as a part of the Thought WorksAgile

 

Senator Scott Ludlum appeared on a Skype connect and gave a very erudite account of the state of the surveillance machine.

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EFA’s Jon Lawrence (EO) spoke about the history of internet surveillance activism transcending through different generations right up to the modern Snowden release.

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An important issue Jon raised was the fact that the same issues are being dealt with today as where being dealt with 20 years ago and without understanding the past, one can not understand the future. Jon speaks about the export ban on the 40 bit key to USA in early 1990’s and the Governments realisation that encryption has benefits for the wider online community, which led to the rise of internet banking and other such transactions.

 

 

 

 

Vodafone – Secret Six

In Activism, Anonymous, ANT, Archive, ASIO, Australia, Bahrain, Big Brother, Big Data, CENTCOM, CIA, CYBERCOM, DAILY NEWS ARCHIVE, DEA, DOJ, EFF, Encryption, FBI, Five Eyes, FOI, FOIA, FRA, GCHQ, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong, Huawei, India, Indonesia, INSCOM, Internet, INTERPOL, Israel, Japan, Kenya, LAPD, leaksource, Mali, Mandela, NDAA, New Zealand, News, Norway, OPEC, Politics, PSYOP, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Scotland, Snowden, Somalia, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Surveillance, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, TAO, Technology, TrapWire, TSA, Turkey, Uganda, UK, Ukraine, USA, Venezuela, Verizon on June 7, 2014 at 11:52 AM

Vodafone in all their magnificence and gorgeosity have shocked the monkey and released a “Law Enforcement Disclosure Report” (here). At the request of little old Gardai.

Unfortunately they have upset the Department of Justice who are claiming that the information Vodafone released could ‘compromise national security and hinder investigation of  serious criminal activity’.

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The wonderful folk at Vodafone reveal in the report the surveillance practices of governments in 29 countries which it operates in, but stops short of disclosing details of data surveillance in Ireland.

One can only assume this is to thwart any recriminations, from spooks. Vodafone also point out in the release that reports from other operators can have inherent flaws…

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We have compared the statistical information we hold for our own operations in the two countries in question with the information recently published by other local operators in those countries. For some categories of agency and authority demand, the volumes involved seem closely comparable between Vodafone and other local operators, although as explained above, there is a significant risk of under or over-counting overlapping demands issued to multiple operators. Furthermore, it is also clear that certain categories of agency and authority demand have been omitted from local operators’ publications, either to comply with legal restrictions (in the case of Australia) or (in Germany) for reasons not disclosed to us.”

The Report chants the mantra “it is unlawful to disclose any information related to wiretapping or interception of the content of phone calls and messages including whether such capabilities exist.” but points that in 6 countries “authorities” have unfettered access and that the law either ‘obliges’ telecom operators to install direct access pipes, or allow governments to do so.

Vodafone further explain that these 6 un-named countries have “regimens” that could retaliate by imprisoning staff…who could that be? (read the .pdf)

However after reading through the lines and thinking about it for a few minutes…it’s not hard to narrow down the “6” countries. The graphic below from The Guardian’s Juliette Garside makes this a no brainer.

With all respect to the fantastic and marvellous work Law Enforcement do, it is important Telecommunication Companies are finally finding their own voice amongst the schrills and squawks that have become a hysterical mist of white noise…well done Vodafone.

 

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Leaked U.N. Report Indicates Sri Lanka War Crimes

In News, Other Leaks, Sri Lanka, World Revolution on April 19, 2011 at 2:00 AM

A leaked United Nations report indicates “credible allegations” of Sri Lanka war crimes. Video first broadcast by Channel 4 News, showing alleged Tamil executions, formed a key part of the evidence.

Channel 4 News obtains exclusive footage from the “closed off”corner of northern Sri Lanka, showing evidence of camps, repression and abuse, ahead of the publication of the UN’s report on war crimes.

READ SUMMARY OF LEAKED REPORT HERE:

Report of the UNSG’s panel of experts on accountability in SL

Ban Ki Moon’s Expert Panel Report

Related: UN spokesman regrets premature publication – Ban “reviewing” Advisory Panel report

TAKE ACTION NOW!

Dear UN Secretary-General, tell us what you know about Sri Lanka

Dr Manoharan has been fighting for 5 years to bring his son’s murderers to court. This film follows the 70 year old doctor from Sri Lanka to London and the UN building in New York with a 50,000 strong petition for Amnesty International members. They demand Justice for the thousands of victims lost or killed in Sri Lanka, as a UN report is written on accountability for war crimes committed in the Sri Lankan armed conflict.

It must be made public, Amnesty International said as a panel of experts submitted their findings to UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon.

In May 2009, Sri Lanka’s decades long civil war with the Tamil Tigers, the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam came to a bloody close after government forces launched a massive offensive.

What exactly happened during the last days of the battle is still the subject of fierce debate, but it is clear that as the rebel perimeter shrank, around a third of a million civilians were trapped between the two armies and tens of thousands were killed.

Update:

A UN report on the Sri Lanka war is delayed as the Sri Lankan Government warns it has gone too far. A key player in the Sri Lankan reconciliation process tells Channel 4 News the report is “vulgar”.

Channel4:

The Sri Lankan government appears to have successfully delayed the publication of a critical UN report. By securing an agreement that the report’s release would be held back until a Sri Lankan government response could be prepared, the Colombo authorities look to have forced the deferral of its release. It may be published over the Easter weekend, but is likely to receive much less global attention as a result.

The report on atrocities committed at the end of the 26-year Sri Lanka war, which has already been leaked, was compiled by a UN panel advising the Secretary General on accountability, and accuses both the Sri Lankan Government and the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE or Tamil Tigers) of “crimes against humanity”.

It focuses in the main on the Government’s responsibility for the deaths of tens of thousands of civilians in the final bloody months of the civil war in 2009, which ended with Government victory.

Overstepped

Ahead of the expected publication, the Sri Lankan Foreign Minister said the report had overstepped its mandate.

Foreign Minister GL Peiris said: “So how can this panel transform itself into an investigative panel? They must confine themselves to the limit of their mandate.”

He said Sri Lanka had strongly urged UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon not to formally publish the report, and declined to comment on the detail until it was published. Sri Lanka banned the panel from entering the country during its investigations.

“We are very much conscious of the fact that the need of the hour is reconciliation,” Mr Peiris said. “What needs to be emphasised is oneness and solidarity…we have to consider whether it is useful to have a report of this nature.”

‘Vulgar’

Professor Rajiva Wijesinha, a Sri Lankan MP who was central to the Government’s reconciliation efforts towards the end of the war, told Channel 4 News the report was “vulgar”.

Professor Wijesinha, the former Secretary-General of the Sri Lankan Government Secretariat for Coordinating the Peace Process (SCOPP), and former Secretary to the Ministry of Disaster Management and Human Rights, said: “The bulk of the Sri Lankans will find this report a very vulgar exercise.

“I don’t think anyone’s got particularly excited about it at the moment, I think it is important that members of the Security Council have made it very very clear that this is not an official document and I think this whole exercise has been rather regrettable.

“As I told the British, if you want us to hark back to terrorism, we are not playing at all. If you want to encourage us to work with the Tamil population of Sri Lanka, well that’s what we want to do.”

Criticism

The report will suggest there are “credible allegations” of war crimes which – if proven – suggest a “grave assault on the entire regime of international law”. It will indicate that actions by both the Sri Lankan government and the Tamil Tigers could amount to war crimes and crimes against humanity.

These alleged crimes include executions, rape and torture by Government forces. The leaked report also lists the shelling of civilians inside “no-fire zones”, the “systematic shelling” of hospitals and attacks on the UN and Red Cross.

The LTTE stands accused of refusing civilians permission to leave the conflict zone and “using them as hostages” in a “buffer zone”. The report also took into account a Channel 4 News video, which appeared to show executions and raised new questions over war crimes.

The Sri Lankan Government maintains it should be allowed to look into its own affairs through its Lessons Learnt and Reconciliation Commission.

But many human rights organisations, as well as civilians, who are still searching for their family members or grieving for those they lost in the war, feel that someone must be held to account and international pressure could be the only way.

Dr Manoharan, whose son was killed by security forces in 2006, told Channel 4 News he has been searching for justice for his son, and all the other victims in Sri Lanka, ever since.

“I want a judgement on this and I hope the UN will release their report – I have a right to see that report and so do all the civilians in Sri Lanka,” he said.

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